FOLLOWING TOO CLOSE AND THE TWO SECOND RULE

 

Only a fool breaks the 2-second rule. As the car in front of you passes a telegraph pole or something stationary at the side of the road.  You say, "Only a fool breaks the two second rule".  If you have passed the telegraph pole or the chosen stationary object at the side of the road before you have finished, then you are following too close. Keep repeating the phrase until you are at the chosen point as you finish the phrase. You might think the gap is too big, but it isn't; continue to follow at that distance.  Don't go down the road of thinking it's too big and the driver behind will go into the gap.  If he does, so what, he won't stay there long as he will soon be on the move; just let him get on with it. We all know that following too close is one of the main causes of accidents and especially in adverse weather conditions; but it is still done on a very regular basis for all to see on any road you care to observe traffic. Accidents occur because we haven't a clue about distances! An interesting point to think about is that when travelling at 30mph you are travelling at 44 feet per second. If you have to stop quickly; you will have travelled approximately nine metres (30 feet) before your brakes begin to act due to you reactions.

Next time you are out walking in the country or go to the shop, whether on your own or with a partner; pick a lamppost or parked car or something in front of you.  Guess the distance, say, 30yds, and count your paces up to it.  Vary the next distance to say 60 yards; eventually you will get reasonably accurate at judging distances.  If I was to ask you the overall stopping distance at 40 mph, you might say 36 metres or 120 feet, correct.  The next question would be, point that out to me. Ask several people to point out a distance to you and you will be amazed at the variation in the distances pointed out.  It is no good knowing the stopping distances in theory if you haven't got a clue in practice.  You can always use the two-second rule.

 

      

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